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Department of Sociology and Anthropology

 

Faculty

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Samantha Ammons
placeholder Samantha Ammons

Assistant Professor of Sociology
Work, Family, Sex and Gender, Organizations, Qualitative Research Methods
Ph.D. University of Minnesota, 2008

Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.3358
Email: sammons@unomaha.edu

 

Dr. Samantha Ammons is an Assistant Professor in Sociology. She joined the UNO faculty in 2008 after receiving her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Ammons currently teaches Work and Society, Research Methods, Introduction to Sociology, and Sociology of Gender. She is broadly interested in the intersection of work, family, gender and organizations. Her current research projects examine how individuals craft and maintain boundaries between their work and personal lives and the impact of these boundaries on other family members.

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Timi Barone
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Associate Professor of Anthropology
Medical Anthropology, Ethnomedicine, Human Adaptation
Ph.D. Case Western Reserve University, 1997

Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.3372
Email: tbarone@unomaha.edu

An Associate Professor of Anthropology with a specialization in Medical Anthropology. Her primary research interests are in the biocultural basis of health and barriers to health care access/utilization for minority populations. Recent research focuses on the cross-cultural study of sleep and health from the perspective of Darwinian medicine. Dr. Barone is a member of the Women's Studies faculty, Native American Studies Faculty and the Latino/Latin American Studies faculty at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. She currently teaches Introduction to Anthropology, Introduction to Physical Anthropology, Nonwestern and Alternative Medicines, Ethnomedicines of the Americas, Applied Anthropology and Sex, Evolution and Society.

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Lourdes Gouveia
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Professor of Sociology
Director, Office of Latino/Latin American Studies (OLLAS)
Development, Food and Agriculture, Latino/a Latin American Sociology, Immigration
Ph.D. University of Kansas, 1989

Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.3835
Email: lgouveia@unomaha.edu

Dr. Gouveia is a Professor of Sociology and the Director of the Office of Latino/Latin American Studies of the Great Plains at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. She obtained her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Kansas. Since her arrival in Nebraska in 1989, she has been studying and writing about the interrelation between the global restructuring of meat processing, the recruitment of Latino immigrant labor, and the implications of these changes for the future of Latino immigrant labor flows and their communities of settlement. She has published numerous articles and co-authored a book on the subject. Among the more recent ones are an article in the journal Great Plains Studies titled, "Global Forces and Latino Population Growth in the Midwest: A Regional and Subregional Analysis," "Latino Immigrants, Meatpacking and Rural Communitites: A Case Study of Lexington, Nebraska" A Research Report published by the Julian Samora Institute of Michigan State University and, most recently, a study conducted with Miguel Carranza from UNL and commissioned by the Nebraska state Legislature on the incorporation of Latino Immigrant Workers to Neberaska. She is the Principal investigator of a $1 millions congressional earmark to expand the work of her Latino/Latin American Studies program, including research on the second generation and political and economic incorporation of new immigrants. She is currently participating int he Chicago Council on Foreign Affairs' taskforce on immigration which is drafting immigration policy recommondations from the Midwest perspective, and participated on a similar taskforce convened by Governor Johanns to deal with the crisis resulting from Operation Vanguard. Dr. Gouveia is also a Board member of the Nebraska Appleseed Center for Law in the Public Interest which has been at the forefront of immigration policy issues in the state. She works closely with several other research project on the factors that facilitate or impede Nebraska Latinos' education attainment in collaboration with Omaha's Chicano Awareness Center, Omaha Public Schools District (OPS) and the Mexican American Commission. She is the 2003 recipient of the City of Omaha Latinos on the Move Award on Education.

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Daniel Hawkins
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Associate Professor of Sociology
Family, Fatherhood, Biosociology, Sociology of Sport
Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University, 2006

Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.4935
Email: dhawkins@unomaha.edu

 

I am an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. I received a BS in Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2000 and a PhD in Sociology from the Pennsylvania State University in 2006. I started my position at UNO in the fall of 2006.

My main research interests are in the area of family sociology, particularly fatherhood, parent-child relations, marital quality, and biosocial factors related to family relationships. My work appears in the American Sociological Review, the Journal of Marriage and Family, Social Forces, and the Journal of Family Issues. My current research examines the relationship between father involvement and the quality of men’s lives. I find that father involvement tends to be positively related to men’s psychological well-being, especially for those dads who value participating in intensive parenthood because of religious or ideological reasons. As a side interest, I’m also currently involved in a project that examines the relationship between attitudes toward globalization and feelings about the sport of soccer.

I’ve taught a number of courses, including Introductory Sociology, Sociology of Families, Social Statistics, American Family Problems, and the graduate Research Methods and Statistics sequence. I hope to teach classes on fatherhood, family law, biosociology, and the sociology of sport in the near future. I’m also the chair of the Sociology Graduate Program and the faculty advisor for the Sociology Club.

Outside of work, I enjoy spending time with my wife and daughter, going to the movies and concerts, and playing and watching sports of all kinds.

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Jay Irwin
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Assistant Professor of Sociology
Medical Sociology, Sexualities, Sex and Gender, Research Methods
Ph.D. University of Alabama at Birmingham, 2009

Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.2976
Email: jirwin@unomaha.edu

Jay A. Irwin is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. He received a PhD in Medical Sociology from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 2009. He started his position at UNO in the Fall of 2009.

Dr. Irwin's research interests are in the area of medical sociology, specifically health disparities of marginalized communities. To date these communities include the homeless, self-identified southern lesbians, and the LGBT population of Nebraska. He has published work in Social Science & Medicine, Journal of Health Psychology, Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, Women's Health Issues, and Journal of General Internal Medicine. Past research includes investigations on the mental health of the homeless as it relates to stress, social connectivity, and social capital; tracking access to health care among the homeless over a 10 year period; suicidal thoughts among the homeless; the general health of lesbians as compared to heterosexual women in the south; and alcohol use and abuse among southern lesbians. His current research focuses on health and social issues of members of the LGBT community of Nebraska, including suicide ideation and attempts, transgender identity formation, and depression. Future research interests include the use of internet technology for sexual and gender minority communities, the coverage of sexual and gender minorities in popular media, and issues of access to appropriate health care.

Dr. Irwin currently teaches Introductory Sociology, Research Methods, Medical Sociology, and Contemporary Social Topics: Sociology of Sexualities. In the near future, he will be teaching Social Statistics. Other teaching interests include Sociology of Mental Health, Sociology of Gender, and a graduate level course in Medical Sociology. Dr. Irwin is also Affiliated Faculty with Women's and Gender Studies.

Dr. Irwin is involved in a number of professional organizations, including the American Sociological Association, Midwest Sociological Society, Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality, and American Public Health Association. Locally, Dr. Irwin participates in the Professional Transgender Resource Network, an organization of medical providers, counselors, lawyers, academics, and community members dedicated to increasing access to pertinent services for the transgender and gender non-conforming population of Nebraska.

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Kitti John
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Kitti John
Instructor

 

 

 

 

 

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Alan Osborn
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Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Great Plains Archaeology, Paleoindian Adaptations, Nutritional Anthropology
Ph.D. University of New Mexico, 1977
Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.2627
Email: Aosborn2@unl.edu

Dr. Alan J. Osborn is an assistant professor of anthropology. He received his advanced degrees in anthropology at the University of New Mexico. He has conducted archaeological fieldwork in the Midwest, Southwest, and the Great Plains regions of North America as well as in the Andean countries of Peru and Ecuador. He has published a number of articles in the American Anthropologist, Current Anthropology, Journal of Anthropological Research, and the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology. Dr. Osborn has also co-edited three books, book reviews, and archaeological reports. His research interests include Plains archaeology and anthropology, South American archaeology, maritime adaptations, human nutrition, and PaleoIndian adaptive responses to cold stress.

He holds an academic appointment at the Midwest Archeological Center (National Park Service) and serves as Curator of Anthropology and director of the Nebraska Archaeological Survey at the University of Nebraska State Museum.

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A. Olu Oyinlade
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Professor of Sociology
Industrial/Organizational Sociology, Applied (Social) Demography, Race Relations
Ph.D. South Dakota State University, 1987

Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.3371
Email: aoyinlade@unomaha.edu

Professor Oyinlade is primarily an Industrial/Organizational Sociologist. His formal graduate education included training in Formal (i.e. Complex) Organizations, Industrial Management and Applied (Social) Demography with a special focus on Type II Population Studies. In addition, he is a Race-Ethnic Relations Scholar. He currently teaches advanced courses that include Social Organizations, Formal (Complex) Organizations, Social Diversity in Organizations, and Race-Ethnic Relations. At the lower level, he teaches Introduction to Sociology and Social Problems. His prior employments included academic positions at both private and public universities in Massachusetts, South Dakota and Nebraska. He also served as the director of the university honors program for Northern State University, Aberdeen, SD, between 1992 and 1993.

As an Industrial/Organizational Sociologist, Professor Oyinlade’s expertise is in Organization Development with a special focus on organizational performance improvement through structural analysis of human behaviors and organizational structural adjustments. Organizational Sociology deals with the structural analysis and solutions to human relations and organizational processes that hinder organizational performance. Organizational problems are mainly structural, and they easily hinder organizational performance. Therefore, to solve organizational problems, it is important to provide structural solutions. Only structural solutions have the potential to be long lasting or permanent. With his expertise, Dr. Oyinlade is available to consult on structural analysis and solutions to organizational problems such as low productivity, employee motivation and job satisfaction, employee turnover, change management, leadership effectiveness and customer satisfaction. He is also available to consult on program evaluation and needs assessment for organization and community.

As a race-ethnic relations scholar, Dr. Oyinlade’s consulting skills are mainly in diversity management in organizations. He is well skilled in developing organizational diversity plans for specific organizational diversity needs. He is also skilled in solving many diversity related problems, such as conflict, oppressive behaviors, avoidance, isolation, turnover, segregation and alienation. He is available to conduct productive diversity seminars, lectures, workshops and executive coaching on both diversity issues and performance improvement management.

Professor Oyinlade’s research spans over various areas of organization development, leadership, organizational diversity and the impact of migration on employment and economic characteristics. He has presented his research at local, regional, national and international professional conferences, and his research has been published in scientific journals such as the Sociological Spectrum, Performance Improvement Quarterly, Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, Educational Research Quarterly, the Great Plains Sociologist and the Great Plains Research. He is the creator and author of a standards-based method of assessing leadership effectiveness known as the “Essential Behavioral Leadership Qualities” [EBLQ] Method. He is also a co-author of an Introduction to Sociology textbook; “Basic Sociology: A Comprehensive Introduction”, published by BVT Publishing. In 2009, the Marquis Who’s Who Publication Board entered Professor Oyinlade’s biographical record into “Who’s Who in America”.

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Julie Pelton
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Assistant Professor of Sociology
Theory, Inequality, Social Movements, Sociology of Culture
Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University, 2006
Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.4125
Email: jpelton@unomaha.edu

Julie Pelton is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. She completed her BS in Sociology at Illinois State University in 1999 and her PhD in Sociology (with a Women’s Studies Minor) at The Pennsylvania State University in 2006.

Dr. Pelton’s primary research interests include classical and contemporary social theory, sociology of culture, social change and social movements, and inequality. She is broadly interested in the role of culture in social movements and the impact of movements on contemporary American culture. She is currently working on a study of the discourse about dissent and protest in mainstream national newspapers during the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. It combines her academic and personal interests in the sociological study of culture, media, contentious politics, and pathways to social change. She is also interested in pedagogy and the Sociology of Teaching and Learning.

Dr. Pelton currently teaches courses at the graduate and undergraduate level, including Social Inequality, Social Stratification, and The Development of Sociological Theory. Her other teaching interests include social problems, sociology of gender, social movements, and culture.

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Mary Ann Powell
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Department Chair

Associate Professor of Sociology
Department Chair
Family, Education, Gender, Quantitative Methodology
Ph.D. Ohio State University, 1999
Phone: 402.554.2632
Email: maryannpowell@unomaha.edu

Dr. Powell's primary research interests include family inequality. She studies how educational systems and family structures during childhood affect educational outcomes as children mature. She is currently working on a multi-faceted research project on Latino educational attainment in Nebraska.Further interests include gender inequality at work and gender differences in the interplay of work and family. In both work and family studies, Dr. Powell seeks to understand the ways in which social structures affect inequality, and how these processes may vary comparatively. She is also interested in the pedagogy of teaching statistics and in math and statistics anxiety in students. Dr. Powell's teaching interests include Quantitative Research Methods and Statistics, Marriage and Family, American Family Problems, Comparative Work and Family, Gender Stratification. Dr. Powell is an active member of the Office of Latino/Latin American Studies (OLLAS) Faculty and the Women's Studies Faculty.

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Beth Ritter
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Associate Professor of Anthropology and Native American Studies
Federal Indian Policy, Contemporary Native American Issues
Ph.D. University of Nebraska Lincoln, 1999

Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.3376
Email: britter@unomaha.edu

Beth R. Ritter is an Associate Professor of Anthropology. Dr. Ritter's primary area of specialization is the applied anthropology of Native North America with emphases in federal Indian policy and contemporary Native American issues (e.g., gaming, health, dispossession, and repatriation). Dr. Ritter has worked extensively with the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska since 1989 and has published several journal articles on Ponca culture and history (e.g., Human Organization, Great Plains Quarterly, and Great Plains Research ) as well as several scholarly research reports for the Tribe. Research in progress includes an article on nineteenth century Ponca history and a book on the dispossession of the Yankton Sioux Tribe.

Dr. Ritter holds a joint teaching appointment in anthropology and Native American Studies. Recent course offerings include: Introduction to Native American Studies, Peoples and Cultures of Native North America, Native Americans and Health, Research Ethics in the 21st Century: Indians and Anthros, and Introduction to Anthropology.

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Jacob Rizk
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Jacob Rizk
Instructor

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tom Sanchez
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Associate Professor of Sociology and Latino/Latin American Studies
Migration and Immigration, Race/Ethnic/Minority Relations, Theory
Ph.D. University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2004

Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.4977
Email: thomassanchez@unomaha.edu

 

 

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Edouardo Zendejas
Edouardo zendejasEdouardo Zendejas

 

 

 

 

 

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Emeritus

Bill Clute (Emeritus)

Professor Emeritus of Sociology
Occupations/Professions, Work and Labor Markets,
Applied Sociology/Evaluation Research
Ph.D. University of Minnesota, 1969

Contact Information
Phone:402.554.3356
Email: wclute@unomaha.edu

William Clute has been in the department for over 36 years. During this time he has taught over 14,000 students, both undergraduate and graduate. For over 20 years, he taught primarily upper division and graduate level courses with emphasis in Sociology of Work (Occupations/Professions and Organizations), Urban Sociology, and Social Gerontology.

He has also created special courses such as Team Research Seminar and Using Multimedia to Examine Social and Cultural Change. He has done extensive consulting work and applied research, both with teams and students as well as private consulting.

He has received University Awards for Excellence in Teaching and Consulting. For the last 14 years his passion has been in undergraduate teaching. He has devoted his creative skills to developing interactive data analysis, computer slideshows, computer lab sessions, multimedia presentations, and team research and consulting projects as well as learning the names of hundreds of students each semester with whom he frequently interacts outside the classroom.

Currently, he has developed his Soc. 3180: Occupations and Careers courses in which he teaches students the social structure of work as well as helping students use this sociological knowledge to relate their education to their own career plans.

Mary Ann Lamana (Emeritus)

Professor Emerita of Sociology
Family, Gender, Law and Policy
Ph.D. University of Notre Dame, 1977

Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.3356
Email: mlamanna@unomaha.edu

Professor Lamanna received her bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Washington University in St. Louis, her Master’s in Sociology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Notre Dame. She came to UNO in 1977, retiring in 2001 as full professor.

Professor Lamanna was one of the founders of the Women’s Studies program at UNO and served as chair of the American Sociological Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in Sociology and of the Midwest Sociological Society’s Committee on the Status of Women in the Profession.

Her teaching and research has focused primarily on family and gender, with another area of interest the intersection of social science and bioethical issues. Recently, Professor Lamanna has returned to writing about Durkheim’s sociology of the family and is also developing a new area, the sociology of literature. She presented a paper on “Novels of Terrorism” at the International Sociological Association Research Forum in Barcelona in 2008 and papers on Proust’s sociological perspective at the 2010 American Sociological Association meeting and the 2011 Eastern Sociological Society meeting.

Publications include:
Mary Ann Lamanna and Agnes Riedmann. Marriages and Families: Making Choices in a
Diverse Society, 11th ed. (2011)

Mary Ann Lamanna. Emile Durkheim on the Family (2002)

William T. Liu, Mary Ann Lamanna, and Alice Murata. Transition to Nowhere: Vietnamese Refugees in America (1979)

and articles in:
Journal of Family Issues
Journal of Law and Family Studies
University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform
Journal of Medical Humanities
The Sociological Quarterly
Teaching Sociology
Southwestern Historical Quarterly
Family Perspectives

Boyd Littrell (Emeritus)

Professor Emeritus of Sociology
Bureaucracy, Deviant Behavior, Medical Policy
Ph.D. New York University, 1974

Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.3356
Email: blittrell@unomaha.edu

Boyd Littrell, Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in introductory sociology, deviant behavior and social control, mental illness, law and family, and medical services, law and public policy. He is interested in the growing importance of bureaucracy in modern life, both in the public and the private sectors of the economy. He traces this theme in nearly all of his courses. He is the author of Bureaucratic Justice: Police, Prosecutors and Plea Bargaining , the editor or co-editor of special issues of Social Problems, American Behavioral Scientist, The Journal of the Applied Behavioral Science, and two other co-edited books. His articles and chapters in books include, among others, “Competition, Bureaucracy and Costs: Hospital Care in a Midwestern City,” “New Technology, Bureaucracy and the Social Construction of Medical Prices,” “Cornell West: An American Public Intellectual,The Liberal Arts and the Working Classes.” He is currently working on a book entitled Corruption: Bureaucracy and Democracy, and articles that pull together his interests in deviant behavior and social control. He is involved in the arts, has acted in local community theaters, sung with Opera Omaha, has presented vocal recitals and concerts. He recently won the jury “Award of Excellence” for a prismacolor drawing. He writes poetry and he reads a lot.

Mark Rousseau (Emeritus)

Professor Emeritus of Sociology
Stratification/Inequality, Political Sociology, Canadian Studies
Ph.D. University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, 1971

Contact Information
Phone:402.554.3356
Email: mrousseau@unomaha.edu

 

Mark O. Rousseau is Professor of Sociology Emeritus at the University of Nebraska–Omaha. He is co-author of Regionalism and Regional Devolution in Comparative Perspective (Praeger 1987), an analysis of regional decentralization in Western Europe. With grant support from the governments of Canada and Québec multiple publications examine ethnic and class conflict in Québec and their relationships to language policy, economic interests and support for a sovereign Québec. Current work addresses the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie (OIF), an international organization composed primarily of French-speaking states, that works to promote cultural diversity globally in the English language dominated global economy. Of particular interest is the OIF’s insistence on excepting cultural products from the trade regimen of the corporate dominated World Trade Organization, examined in recent articles in Québec Studies (2002)and the French Review (2005). Rousseau was on sabbatical leave Fall 2005 and Fall 2006 to work on a co-authored book on Francophonie. His teaching interests center in Social Inequality, Comparative Political Economy, and French and Canadian Studies.

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Robert Simpson (Emeritus)

Professor Emeritus of Sociology
Ph.D. Washington University - St. Louis, 1970

Andy Skreija (Emeritus)

Associate Professor of Anthropology
Race/Ethnic/Minority Relations
Ph.D. University of Minnesota, 1973

Contact Information
Phone: 402.554.3356
Email: andrisskreija@unomaha.edu