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policies, procedures and official catalog.

Email Accounts

All students enrolled at UNO have a Gmav account. Information Services (IS) mails every registered student a flier informing them of Gmav email.

Gmav email is an important service that gives students, faculty and staff a common communication tool. Student use of Gmav is strongly encouraged. Many departments and faculty will be using Gmav as the sole source of communication to students. It is a benefit to everyone if all students understand that Gmav is a vital part of communication at UNO.

Academic Integrity

All students at UNO are expected to conduct their academic affairs in an honest and responsible manner. Any student found guilty of dishonesty in academic work shall be subject to disciplinary actions. Acts of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to:

  • plagiarism*, i.e., the intentional appropriation of the work, be it ideas or phrasing of words, of another without crediting the source;
  • cheating, i.e, unauthorized collaboration or use of external information during examinations;
  • assisting fellow students in committing an act of cheating;
  • falsely obtaining, distributing, using or receiving test materials or academic research materials;
  • submitting examinations, themes, reports, drawings, laboratory notes, research papers or other work as one's own when such work has been prepared by another person or copied from another person (by placing his/her own name on a paper, the student is certifying that it is his/her own work); or
  • improperly altering and/or inducing another to improperly alter any academic record.

Additionally, graduate students are more likely to assume roles as active scholars. With these roles come added responsibilities for academic honesty. For such individuals academic honesty requires an active pursuit of truth not just an avoidance of falsehood. This pursuit includes but is not limited to:

  • providing a full and complete representation of any scholarly find, be it experimental data or information retrieved from archives;
  • taking care that the resources of the University (e.g., library materials, computer, or laboratory equipment) are used for their intended academic purposes and they are used in a manner that minimizes the likelihood of damage or unnecessary wear;
  • assuring that one's co-workers are given due credit for their contributions to any scholarly endeavor;
  • respecting a diversity of opinion and defending one's colleagues as well as one's own academic freedom;
  • respecting the rights of other students who may come under the tutelage of the graduate student and being fair and impartial in grading and other forms of evaluation; and
  • seeking permission from an instructor when submitting to that instructor work which the student has submitted for a course taken in the past or intends to submit for another course currently being taken. In cases of alleged academic dishonesty, the instructor shall attempt to discuss the matter with the student and explain the sanction(s) which he/she plans to impose. In the event that the student challenges the allegation of academic dishonesty, or is not satisfied with the sanctions(s) imposed by the instructor, the student may file an appeal according to the approved appeal policies of the University of Nebraska Graduate College.

* "By plagiarizing, a student is, in effect, claiming credit for another individual's thinking and expression. Whether the student has read or heard of the information used, the student must document the source of information. When utilizing written sources, a clear distinction should be made between quotations (which reproduce information from the source word-for-word within quotation marks) and paraphrases (which are restatements of the source information produced in the student's own words). Both direct quotations and paraphrases must be documented. Even though a student rephrases, condenses or selects from another person's work the ideas are still the other person's and failure to give credit constitutes misrepresentation of the student's actual work and plagiarism of another person's idea. Purchasing a paper or copying another person's work and handing it in as the student's personal work is plagiarism and misrepresentation." From the Oakland University Graduate Catalog, 1987-89

Appeal of General Academic Matters Related to Student Programs

  1. Graduate students holding admission with Unclassified status in the Graduate College, admission with a master's objective or admission with a doctoral objective (but prior to the appointment of a doctoral supervisory committee) should appeal as follows:
    1. Initially, the appeal may be submitted to the student's adviser.
    2. If denied, the appeal may be submitted to the department/area Graduate Program Committee administratively responsible for the student's graduate program.
    3. If denied, an appeal may be made to the Graduate Council for the campus administratively responsible for the student's graduate program. Normally, this will be the final appeals body (for exceptions, see the last part of this section).
  2. Graduate students holding admission with a doctoral objective in the Graduate College and for whom a doctoral supervisory committee has been appointed should appeal as follows:
    1. Initially, the appeal should be submitted to the student's adviser.
    2. If denied, the appeal may be submitted to the student's supervisory committee.
    3. If denied, the appeal may be submitted to the department/area Graduate Program Committee administratively responsible for the student's graduate program.
    4. If denied, an appeal may be made to the Graduate Council for the campus administratively responsible for the student's graduate program. Normally, this will be the final appeals body (for exceptions, see the last part of this section).
  3. When a student's graduate program consists of registrations essentially or entirely on one campus, the Graduate Council of the campus administratively responsible for the program will constitute the appeal board. When a student's graduate program includes substantial registrations on a campus other than the one administratively responsible for the program, three members of the Graduate Council for the other campus will be designated by the Dean for Graduate Studies on that campus to augment the Graduate Council on the campus administratively responsible for the program. In this case, the augmented Council will constitute the appeal board. The decision concerning augmentation of a campus Graduate Council for a specific appeal involving registrations on a campus other than the one administratively responsible for the student's program will be made by the Deans for Graduate Studies on the campuses involved.
  4. In all cases, appeals should be made in writing to the appropriate adviser, committee or council. In those cases where the appeal concerns graduate-level qualifying exams, comprehensive exams or final oral exams, the following deadlines must be observed. It is the responsibility of the student to make reasonable efforts to ascertain the results of the examination within 30 days after its completion. The initiation of the appeal, in writing, by the student must be filed within 30 days following the student's receipt of notification of the evaluation. In those cases involving an appeal of termination of program, initiation of the appeal, in writing, by the student must be filed within 30 days following the student's receipt of the official written notification by the Office of Graduate Studies.
  5. Appeals
    1. There is no absolute right of appeal to the Executive Graduate Council. The Executive Graduate Council will accept appeals only in those cases where in the exercise of its sole discretion it shall first find that one or more of the following grounds for accepting the appeal exist:
      1. That the campus Graduate Council has violated some element of fair procedure (example: has failed to allow the parties concerned to present their cases fully to their campus Graduate Council);
      2. That the campus Graduate Council has failed to examine or give adequate weight to important evidence relevant to one party's position;
      3. That the campus Graduate Council has given undue weight to evidence not pertinent to the case; or
      4. That some gross miscarriage of justice would be perpetrated if the decision of the campus Graduate Council is allowed to stand.
        A decision by the Executive Graduate Council not to accept jurisdiction of an appeal shall be final and is not subject to further appeal.
    2. Appeals to the Executive Graduate Council must be made in writing and must specifically outline the grounds for appeal. Such appeal must be made within 20 working days of the day the decision of the campus council is received (working days shall not include those days the University is not in session).
    3. The Executive Graduate Council must make a decision to hear the appeal or not to hear the appeal within 30 working days after receipt of the appeal. Acceptance or denial of jurisdiction over the appeal will be made in writing.
    4. The decision of the Executive Graduate Council on the merits of the case will be made and transmitted to the concerned parties within 40 working days after the decision to hear the appeal.
    5. No person who was a member of the department or campus graduate council involved in the case will be eligible to participate in the decisions of the Executive Graduate Council either to decide whether the case should be heard or to decide the merits of the case. However, the Dean for Graduate Studies may replace members of the Executive Graduate Council not eligible for participation in the decision to hear the appeal or in the appeal itself.