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2010.01.22> For Immediate Release
contact: Tim Kaldahl - University Relations
phone: 402.554.3502 - email: tkaldahl@unomaha.edu

OLLAS Announces Demographic and Socio‐Economic Trends Findings

Omaha - The Office of Latino/Latin American Studies of the Great Plains (OLLAS) at the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) today issued a first report in a data series that will focus on the Latino and foreign-born population in Nebraska and across borders. The publication now available is titled “Demographic and Socio‐Economic Trends,” and is produced by Lourdes Gouveia, OLLAS director.

“We have a wealth of material to pull from,” Gouveia said. “This first report documents the demographic changes experienced by Nebraska’s entire foreign‐born population and the Latino/Hispanic population, in particular, going back to at least 1990.”

The report utilizes data from the many U.S. decennial censuses. One table even goes back to 1860, Gouveia said. The bulk of the report, however, is based on OLLAS tabulations gleaned from the 2008 American Community Survey.

“We hope this serves as a reference tool for community organizations, policy‐makers, students and scholars,” Gouveia said. She added that much of the data in this report will get updated as new releases from the American Community Survey become available.

Key facts found in this report include:

• Nebraska’s foreign‐born population reached 25 percent in 1870 and remained at levels higher than today’s until the onset of World War II. In 2008, only 5.5 percent of Nebraska’s population was foreign‐born;

• Nebraska represents a “new gateway” destination for immigrants from Latin America (57 percent), Asia (22 percent) and Africa (8 percent);

• Nebraska experienced the highest foreign‐born population growth rate among all Midwestern states between 1990 and 2000. However, Missouri and Indiana experienced higher rates than Nebraska between 2000 and 2008;

• Underscoring the newness of this latest migration wave, more than half of Nebraska’s foreign‐born residents (67 percent) are not yet U.S. citizens;

• The overwhelming majority of foreign‐born residents (75.3 percent) are of working age;

• The majority of Latinos in Nebraska were born in the U.S (60.6 percent);

• Douglas County's Latino population increased by nearly 59 percent between 2000 and 2008. U.S. born Latinos, largely the children of immigrants, contributed to the majority of that growth (73.4 percent).

For more information, contact Gouveia at lgouveia@unomaha.edu. The report can be downloaded at http://www.unomaha.edu/ollas/.

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The University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) is Nebraska’s metropolitan university. The core values of the institution place students at the center of all that the university does; call for the campus to strive for academic excellence; and promote community engagement that transforms and improves urban, regional, national and global life. UNO, inaugurated in 1968, emerged from the Municipal University of Omaha, established in 1931, which grew out of the University of Omaha founded in 1908.

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