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2008.09.23 > For Immediate Release
contact: Wendy Townley - University Relations
phone: 402.554.2762 - email: wtownley@unomaha.edu

UNO Lecturer Writes Book on Religion and Film

Omaha - Julien R. Fielding, a part-time lecturer in the Department of Religion at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, has written “Discovering World Religions at 24 Frames Per Second” for Scarecrow Press.

It will be published Oct. 28.

The 560-page book is unique in the area of religion and film studies in that it isn’t a collection of essays and that it goes outside of the typical area of Judaeo-Christian interpretation. Instead it provides the reader with the necessary background in the various religions before looking at how their ideas can be understood not through texts but through the cinematic media. Religions considered include Buddhism, Hinduism, Daoism, Confucianism, Shinto and more.

To keep the conversation fresh, most of the films used in the book were made within the last decade. Furthermore, examples range from popular, mainstream fare, such as the “Star Wars” sextet, “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy, and “Kung Fu Panda,” to lesser known foreign films, such as the “Great Yokai War” and “The Wooden Man’s Bride.” Several films with “cult-like” status are also discussed, including “Fight Club,” “Jacob’s Ladder” and the Hayao Miyazaki classics “Princess Mononoke,” “Spirited Away,” and “My Neighbor Totoro.”

Fielding drew upon her experiences in the classroom to compose her book, recognizing the fact that students find feature films to be an easier and more enjoyable way to learn about religion. Fielding has written widely on religion and film. She is an associate editor of The Journal of Religion and Film. Her next book, which will also be published by Scarecrow Press, will be on Asian film remakes.

Editor’s note: Fielding can be contacted via email at julien@jrfielding.com
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UNO will celebrate its 100th anniversary beginning October 8, 2008. This celebration will recognize the partnership among the City of Omaha, its citizens and UNO to build a vibrant and dynamic community. The centennial theme is “UNO: Central To Our City Since 1908.” This theme acknowledges the past contributions of UNO to the community and sets the stage for great things to come.

UNO, inaugurated in 1968, emerged from the Municipal University of Omaha, established in 1931, which grew out of the University of Omaha founded in 1908. For Centennial information, go to http://www.unomaha.edu/100/.

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