To fully take advantage of this review site, have available your Histology Supplement Sheet, your Van De Graaff text and the Rust text. These micrographs have limitations in color and clarity, and in that they provide only one view of the tissues we are studying. Please review this material "first hand" in the laboratory as often as possible. During the lab exam, you should be able to recognize these tissues, identify the bold faced terms and provide functions as indicated on your Histology Supplement Sheet. The micrographs available for you at this site are:

ARTERY

VEIN

LYMPH NODE

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ARTERY





Arteries in any tissue preparation appear very round, with a thick tunica media (B) of smooth muscle and various amounts of elastic connective tissue. The tunica intima (A), visible at higher magnifications, is simple squamous epithelium. The tunica externa (C) is often difficult to detect. An arteriole will be a smaller version of this structure. When compared to a vein of comparable size, the artery's lumen will be smaller and the tunica media thicker.

Function: to carry blood away from the heart

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VEIN





Veins may or may not be round (they are often flattened) with a comparatively large lumen and a thin tunica media (B) of smooth muscle. The tunica intima (A) is simple squamous epithelium. The tunica externa (C) is often difficult to detect. Venules are smaller versions of a vein. If an artery and vein of the same size are compared, the lumen of the vein would be larger and its tunica media thinner.

Function: to carry blood toward the heart

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ARTERY AND VEIN COMPARED


LYMPH NODE





Only a portion of the lymph node is visible in this micrograph. As with all lymph tissue we are interested in the follicles (A) with the lightly stained germinal centers. The germinal center is a location of B-lymphocyte proliferation and the development of the immune response.

Functions: as lymph filters through the reticular tissue, the phagocytic cells purify the fluid

the lymphocytes provide immunological defenses against disease-causing agents.

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This page was last updated in August, 1997.

All micrographs are the property of Sherri Wick. Students of Biology 2740 and 2840 are welcome to use this page in the study and review of lecture and lab materials in the Human Physiology and Anatomy courses.

If you have comments about this Web site that you would like to share , please use the "Comments Page" available at this site.

 Author: Sherri Wick, Coordinator and Instructor - Human Physiology and Anatomy Laboratories
University of Nebraska at Omaha
Allwine Hall 211E, 554-2343
swick@cwis.unomaha.edu