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These slides have been available as demonstrations in the laboratory. A review of their major differences will help in differentiating these tissues. All of the selected micrographs show the tissues cut to reveal the length of the muscle cells. The slides in the laboratory may have shown cross sections as well. All testing will be done with tissues cut as seen here. Available are:

SMOOTH MUSCLE
SKELETAL MUSCLE
CARDIAC MUSCLE
MOTOR END PLATE



SMOOTH MUSCLE

Smooth muscle cells are spindle shaped and uninucleate. (B).

Locations: walls of hollow organs, i.e. stomach, intestine, uterus, ureter

Functions: involuntary movement - i.e. churning of food, movement of urine from the kidney to the bladder, partuition

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SKELETAL MUSCLE

Skeletal muscle cells run the full length of a muscle. Line A show the width of one cell (fiber). Note the striations characteristics of this muscle type. These cells are multicellular, B marks one nucleus.

Location: muscles associated with the skeleton

Function: voluntary movement

Muscles are connected to bones by tendons. Bones are connected to other bones at their joints by ligaments.

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CARDIAC MUSCLE

Cardiac muscle cells branch, are striated, are uninucleate (B) and have intercalated discs (A).

Locations: heart

Function: involuntary, rhythmic contraction

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MOTOR END PLATE

Skeletal muscles (C) are stimulated by nerve impulses carried by motor neurons. The axon (A) that carries the impulse away from the nerve body ends on muscle fibers in little pads called motor end plates (B).

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This page was last updated in August, 1997.

All micrographs are the property of Sherri Wick. Students of Biology 2740 and 2840 are welcome to use this page in the study and review of lecture and lab materials in the Human Physiology and Anatomy courses.

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 Author: Sherri Wick, Coordinator and Instructor - Human Physiology and Anatomy Laboratories
University of Nebraska at Omaha
Allwine Hall 211E, 554-2343
swick@cwis.unomaha.edu