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Illustrated here are micrographs showing the stages that can be observed during the process of mitosis. These micrographs are of whitefish blastula cells.



INTERPHASE

All of these cells are between divisions. The nuclei are seen with their membranes present. Chromosomes are extended and not visible.






PROPHASE

Since we see chromosomes (they are replicated) appearing as units in the area where the nucleus was located and the nuclear membrane is no longer present, the cell marked "P"shows the signs of this first stage of mitosis.





METAPHASE

The spindle (S) is complete and the chromosomes are lined up at the equator. Cell "M" is in metaphase.




ANAPHASE

The replicated chromosomes are moving away from each other towards the poles, a clear indication that cell "A" is in anaphase.




TELOPHASE

We are rarely able to observe telophase. Cell "T" shows the replicated chromosomes clearly at the poles and the spindle fibers being cut through by the formation of the furrow and cell membrane. Mitosis will be complete when two cells are fully formed.



TELOPHASE

This is another view of telophase with the spindle a little less clear and a completed membrane. When the nucleus has its membrane, the nucleolus is reformed and the chromosomes have unwound, mitosis will be complete.


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This page was last updated in August, 1997.

All micrographs are the property of Sherri Wick. Students of Biology 2740 and 2840 are welcome to use this page in the study and review of lecture and lab materials in the Human Physiology and Anatomy courses.

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 Author: Sherri Wick, Coordinator and Instructor - Human Physiology and Anatomy Laboratories
University of Nebraska at Omaha
Allwine Hall 211E, 554-2343
swick@cwis.unomaha.edu