WARREN ROSSER



Born 1942 in South Wales, United Kingdom
"Warren Rosser; American Works, 1972-1979", a November 1979 exhibition appearing simultaneously at Gallery 72 and the UNO Art Gallery introduced Omaha art enthusiasts to the Professor of Painting at the Kansas City Art Institute, who had studied at the Cardiff College of Art in South Wales and Goldsmith College at the University of London. Since his appearance in "Young British Artists" at London's Tate Gallery in 1968, Rosser had, as UNO Art Gallery Director Donald Doe explained, been "conducting a very personal assault on traditions in contemporary art. He's taken the stretching bar from behind the canvas and made it part of the visible work itself." Built up of layers of encaustic wax, pastels, and acrylic paint and containing trapezoids and triangles balanced against upright elements these paintings challenged the modernist boundaries between painting and sculpture. Rosser used the word swing in titles to stress that these paintings were "about reaction—pulling the forms apart, reassembling, finding new relationships and associations." These concerns are evident in the two lithographs resulting from his residency (June 1-6,1981) that Gary Day and Tom Majeski printed.




Avebury Swing No. 1
1981; color lithograph on HMP Woodstock, Arches; image: 23 3/4 x 18 (58.42 x 45.72), sheet: 31 1/2 x 23 3/4 (78.74 x 58.42); edition of 20
Avebury Swing No. 2
1981; color lithograph on HMP Woodstock, Arches; image: 23 3/4 x 18 (58.42 x 45.72), sheet: 31 1/2 x 23 3/4 (78.74 x 58.42); edition of 20