college of communication fine arts and media
Department of art and art history

 

Bridget Sandhoff

assistant professor, art and art history

(402) 554-4127 • Office: WFAB 320
bsandhoff@unomaha.edu


Biography

Bridget Sandhoff is a native of northwest Iowa and studied at The University of Iowa under the supervision of Dr. Richard D. De Puma. She received her Ph.D. in 2007, writing her dissertation on androgynous imagery in Etruscan art. Along with the Etruscans, she also specializes in the art of Egypt, the ancient Aegean, Greece and Rome. Her minor areas include western medieval art (e.g., cult of the saints and Gothic architecture) and the arts of Asia. She teaches the ancient and medieval art courses in the department. Before arriving at UNO, she taught at Knox College, University of Missouri-St. Louis and the University of Texas at Tyler.

Research Statement

My research addresses several aspects of gender in Etruscan society as well as the rest of the ancient Mediterranean: androgyny, nudity, sexuality, beauty, the role of men and women and identity formation. In particular, my work explores the multiple ways that gender is visualized, especially on Praenestine cistae, engraved bronze mirrors and bronze implements. I am specifically interested in the athletic female body in antiquity, its implications and female "participation" in athletics. This scholarship has led to other areas of exploration such as female aesthetics in Etruria, Etruscan female adolescence, male/female relationships, the expression of love and the reception of and interaction with this imagery.

 


Rank:

Assistant Professor

Department:

Art and Art History

Educational
Background:

The University of Iowa, Ph.D., 2007

Courses Taught:

ART 2050

Survey of Western Art I

ART 4710

Ancient Art History

ART 4780

Late Medieval Art

At UNO Since:

2013

Publications
/Presentations:

Publications:

Book Chapters/Articles

"Sexual Ambiguity? Androgynous Imagery in Etruria." Etruscan Studies 14 (2011), 71-93.

"Isn't S/he Lovely? An Investigation of Androgyny in Etruscan Art." In Gender Identities in the First Millennium BC, edited by Kathryn Lomas and Edward Herring, 97-107. Oxford: Archaeopress, BAR International Series, 2009.

Book Reviews

Ancient Mediterranean Art: The William D. and Jane Walsh Collection at Fordham University, edited by Barbara Cavaliere and Jennifer Udell for Etruscan Studies, 17.1. To be submitted January 2014.

Chapter review of "The Etruscans" for Wadsworth, Cenage Learning—Kleiner, Fred S. 2012. Gardner's Art Through the Ages: A Global History, Vol. 1. Boston: Wadsworth Publishers. Submitted March 2012.

Presentations/Invited Talks:

"Their Women Exercise in the Nude! Greco-Roman Perception of Etruria," Southeastern College Art Conference Annual Conference, Greensboro, North Carolina, October-November 2013.

"Malevolent or Meaningful Beauty? Female Aesthetics in Etruscan Society," Fifth Global Conference: Evil, Women and the Feminine, Prague, Czech Republic, May 2013.

"On the Sidelines: The Etruscans, Gender and Androgyny," Classical Association of the Canadian West Annual Conference, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, March 2013.

"Fact or Fiction? The Truth About Etruscan Women," Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Conference, Boston, Massachusetts, March 2013.

"Being a Girl in Etruria: Examining Etruscan Female Adolescence," Annual International Conference on Fine and Performing Arts (Athens Institute for Education and Research), Athens, Greece, June 2011.

"Silent" Girlhood: Reconstructing Etruscan Female Adolescence," Girls in Antiquity Conference (German Archaeological Institute), Berlin, Germany, October 2010.

"The Labyrinth: An Art Historical Perspective," invited lecture for the Monday Noon Series Lecture at the University of Missouri-Saint Louis, February 2010.

 


Department of Art & Art History
College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media
University Nebraska at Omaha
6001 Dodge Street
Omaha NE 68182-0011
(402) 554.2420 Fax: (402) 554.3436
Info: unocfamprospective@unomaha.edu